Blood of The Martyrs – Trappist Monks in Communist China

Presenting excerpts of the tragic tale of Our Lady of Consolation Trappist Monastery from the book by Theresa Marie Moreau.  Excerpts which, hopefully, will exhibit the reasons for the forming of an underground Catholic Church in China about the time when WWII ended

Communism was busy greedily grabbing land in China, pushing the weaker Japanese invaders out, indoctrinating as they went along, and, introducing chaos into the beauty of the Chinese family … turning one against the other with the Communist cell system which encouraged one to tell the authorities if anyone in their ‘cell’ or anyone at home spoke against the Party, or was a Roman Catholic … or belonged to the Legion of Mary. And on and on.   The Communists had won China. Chairman Mao in power. 

“Fifty million Chinese peasants died during Mao’s ‘Great Leap Forward. He qualifies as the greatest mass murderer in world history.” Frank Diddotec, Historian:  The Independent Woodstock Literary Festival” 

Utter fear was in the air.  For the punishment for speaking against the party could be death. (The term ‘Politically incorrect’ comes to mind here.)  Chinese Catholics died, starving, some being buried alive … others just a simple shot in the head after being beaten brutally until unconscious…..others, like Cardinal Kung, a lifetime in a dank prison cell covered with lice.  Freezing in the cold and sweltering in the summer with a tiny window …. isolated … loyal to the Pope and the True

Now?  Now what?  Now Rome has seemingly compassed against all that is the ‘True’ all over the world, and, the Pope has arranged it so that underground Chinese Catholics must join the national atheist Church or suffer the consequences, which are the same as the Trappist monks you will read about … their cries pierce the very vaults of the heavens ….maryanne84

Excerpts from the book:  Blood of The Martyrs by Theresa Marie Moreau with permission

“The tragic tale of Our Lady of Consolation began on June 16, 1883.  On that glorious day, as the hot summer wind from the Gobi Desert carried its golden dust eastward, and the cicada nymphs emerged reborn, buzzing from their old shell of death, in celebration of their emergence into new life from their old shell of death, Father Ephrem Seignol, a Trappist monk, stood on a ledge in the shadow of the Mongolian Mountains.

Atop a ridge nearly 10,000 feet high, that much closer to God, he glimpsed for the first time the rock-filled valley of Yang Kia Ping  (translation:  Yang family Land, old form of Yangjiaping). Before his eyes lay the birthplace of the Trappist Community in China.

With him, Father Ephrem brought little else except his dreams, his duties of state, God’s will and the name of the future abbey.

Before he had departed from his priory in Tamie, France, for China, from the West for the East, from the Occident for the Orient, he visited his close friend Father John Bosco in Turin, Italy.  The future saint suggested that the abbey be christened with the same name as the chapel in which they were sitting:  Our Lady of Consolation.  And so it came to be.”

 

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The villagers around were happy to have the Sacraments, and, the Trappists.  Many young boys and men had felt the call to the Trappist austere way of life, with its silence, prayer, and solitude. And penance. maryanne84

“Life inside the abbey’s walls, peaceful;  life outside, however, complete turmoil.”

 

Shots could be heard at the monastery as history records for the times … as the invading Japanese fled China and the Communist soldiers with their off brown uniforms  poured over the borders.  They had to appear to be nice to the monks as the Japanese soldiers had a respect for spirituality.  But that was over.

 

March 1941. ” The Communists dropped their masks and revealed their true faces.  They placed the whole community under house arrest.  Under constant surveillance, every move was watched.  Nothing could be done by the monks without permission of the Communists.”

How Our Lady of Consolation “Became No More”

“Father Chrysostomus Chang plumbed the depths of his human will for a supernatural strength.  With only a few minutes remaining of his life in the material world, he lifted his thoughts to the spiritual.  Through screams from the mob, he addressed his confreres at his side one last time, to prepare them not for death, but for everlasting life.

“We’re going to die for God.  Let us lift our hearts one more time in offering our total beings.” he said.

“Helpless, the six Trappist monks stood handcuffed and chained on a makeshift platform target of a frenzied hatred that surged toward them.  The blood en-crusted, lice-infected men, wearing rags caked in their own filth, had nowhere to run, no one to help them.  After six months of mind-bending interrogation and body-rending torture, it was over.  It was all over.

The verdict had just been read by a Chinese Communist officer:  Death.  To be carried out immediately.

Hundreds of crazed peasants, with fists raised, with contorted faces, with spit-covered lips, screamed rehearsed slogans of approval for the approaching slaughter. Executioners – reliable Party henchmen – raised their rifles to exterminate the Roman Catholic monks, believers in the superstitious cult, lovers of the God on the Cross, imported from the Imperial West.

And so it happened on January 28, 1948, in the dead of winter in Pan Pu, an unmapped village, a frigid heathen hell in the Mongolian mountains, somewhere in the frost-covered north of the Republic of China.

Just over the ridge from the pandemonium staged by the soulless Chinese communists – believers in the materialistic cult, lovers of the god of death and destruction – lay the charred ruins of Our Lady of Consolation, the once majestic abbey the monks had called home.

Jostled in the madness, the monks fell to their knees.  With their swollen hands tied and chained behind their backs, they couldn’t even cross themselves – In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost – a final time.

The death squad – Communist soldiers in the ready – loaded their rifles with fresh rounds of ammo.

Shots rang out.  One, then the next, followed by the next, the monks collapsed upon the blood splashed , frozen ground.  Their lifeless bodies dragged to a nearby sewage ditch and dumped into a heap, one on top of the other.  Alerted by the shots, wild dogs, roaming the village’s dirt roads, scavenging for scraps, hurried over to the bodies to investigate.

Sniffing, they lapped up the warm blood, steaming in the icy air..

It was all over.

Our Lady of consolation was no more.”

 

Winner of Los Angeles Press Club Award, 2010                                                                                 Judge’s comment:  “I was drawn into this in-depth series of stories from the opening sentence and couldn’t put it down until I had read every word of every story.  That, to e, represents quality writing and reporting, which are hallmarks of exceptional feature writing.

Winner of Los Angeles Press Club Award 2010                                                                                   Judge’s comment:  Writer knows her audience and provides well-researched details to paint a riveting tale.

Blood of The Martyrs was  originally published in slightly different form, as two separate series of stories in the Remnant.     

           

 

A Brief Message From Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano November 13, 2018

Dear Brothers and Sisters in the U.S.

“I am writing to remind you of the sacred mandate you were given on the day of your

episcopal ordination to lead the flock to Christ.  Meditate on Proverbs 9:10.  ‘The Fear

of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom” :   Do not behave like frightened sheep, but

as courageous shepherds.  Do not be afraid of standing up and doing the right thing for

the victims, for the faithful and for your own salvation.  The Lord will render to every

one of us according to our actions and omissions.

I am fasting and praying for you.”

+ Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano Your Former Apostolic Nuncio

November 13, 2018    St. Frances of Cabrini

https://insidethevatican.com/uncategorized/november-13-2018-tuesday/

 

Santa Maria sopra Minerva Basilica: Without Francis’ Laser Light Show

Photos by Jen Brown  visit jauntingjen.com/santa-maria-minerva-interesting-church

This little church is located behind the Pantheon. It was once a temple for the goddess Minerva.  It became Christianized when Christians became victorious over paganism. Hence the word ‘sopra’ meaning over.  Santa Maria over the pagan goddess Minerva.

download 17.jpgThis is Santa Maria sopra Minerva Basilica.

Most people have viewed Francis’ laser beams sweeping over this beautiful church making it appear to crumble and fracture in upon itself.

“A much older Roman history is just beneath the grounds of the church.  Temples to Isis, Minerva, and Serapis once stood in this now sacred spot.  There’s a hidden Roman history beneath many famous sites in Europe.  Santa Maria sopra Minerva is no exception.  We know that Gnaeus Pompey  (famous for the civil war against Julius Caesar), built the Minervium and dedicated it to the Roman goddess Minerva (Greek: Artemis).  However, this temple may be built upon an even oldersite.  Many sacred sites in Europe have a long history.  Some date all the way back to the Iron Age.”JenBrown

The Egyptian hieroglyphs on the obelisk below are dedicated to the Pharoah Apries.  He is mentioned in the Bible (Jeremiah 44:30) as Hophrah.  The Egyptian obelisk below is dedicated to an Egyptian Pharaoh, sitting on an elephant carved by the famous sculptor Bernini, in front of an ancient Christian Church in Rome.  (Minerva) ”  Jen Brown                                                                           sm-minerva-elephant 2.jpg  “No records exist as to when the Minervium was Christianized.  We know that nuns from Constantinople took over the site in the eighth century.  Most of the early Christian history has been lost.  All we have are archaelogical remains and a few ancient writings.  Jen Brown

The Minervium is a Basilica with exquisite artwork

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This is the body of St. Catherine of Sienna which is enshrined in the Basilica.

“She pressed hard for internal reform of the Church.  John Paul II chose to declare her Co Patron of Europe”  Pope Benedict XVI  November 24, 2010  General Audience in Paul VI hall

The National Catholic Register’s Edward Pentin says “A lightshow projected onto a number of church facades in Rome at the end of October’ Synod was extremely disturbing and even sacrilegious for some observers”

The Minervium was one which was melted and swept to pieces with a Laser light show after which it seemed to collapse into itself  like a 911 nightmare  …   designed for the enjoyment of Francis the Destroyer …  of the Church.

Perhaps St. Catherine of Sienna was getting to him.  She spoke up to Popes.

The Sacrament of Matrimony

Why did Catholics allow the beautiful word ‘Matrimony’ to just ‘slide away?’  Oh yes, there is a reason!

The Cathechism of the Catholic Church still calls it ‘The Sacrament of Matrimony’ … Both Editions.   So why don’t we?

It’s something like ‘Have a Nice Day’  It fits everybody’s PC vocabulary which is now pretty well ensconced in their word bag  Everybody who’s getting married calls it marriage … there’s gay marriage for example, and, all the other marriages. Satan is busy destroying the Godly family as Our Lady of Fatima told Cardinal Caffara in a letter to  St. Lucy of Fatima, was to happen as the last battle between Our Lady and ‘itself’

When I got married, it was called ‘Holy’ Matrimony! WOW !  Let’s take a look at this never heard word:

 

“Matrimony:   The word first appeared in middle English sometime in the 14th century.  It enters English through the Old French word matrimoignie, which comes from the Latin matrimonium.

The root matr … is derived from the Latin word mater, for mother;   the suffix … mony refers to a state of being, a function, or a role.

Therefore, matrimony is literally the state that makes a woman a mother.

The term highlights the extent to which reproduction and childbearing are central to marriage itself.

In Canon Law 105 is we read these words:  ” The matrimonial covenant, by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life, is by its nature ordered toward the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring”                                                                                                                                                   https://thoughtco.com/what-is-matrimony – 542851                                                                          Scott P. Richert

 

 

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